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Adventures in QA - Android M Testing with Doze and App Standby

Android M Testing with Doze and App Standby

You probably all know that Google has started with the rollout of Android M (Marshmallow). Android app developers and testers must know the new features that are coming with the latest version of Android M. Next to the brand new permission system, Android M also introduces Doze and App standby to save battery.

If a user leaves a device unplugged and stationary for a period of time, with the screen off, the device enters Doze mode. In Doze mode, the system attempts to conserve battery by restricting apps’ access to network and CPU-intensive services. It also prevents apps from accessing the network and defers their jobs, syncs, and standard alarms.
Periodically, the system exits Doze for a brief time to let apps complete their deferred activities. During this maintenance window, the system runs all pending syncs, jobs, and alarms, and lets apps access the network. (Source: Google documentation)

In order to be sure that your app is able to handle Doze and app Standby, Google provided some documentation on that. Here are the steps to make sure your app handles Doze (instructions copied from the documentation):

Testing your app with Doze

You can test Doze mode by following these steps: Read more

Reading Recommendations - Adventures in QA

Reading Recommendations # 37

The 37th issue of the reading recommendation contains 6 posts. There is a great blog post from Rob Lambert about “Follow the work – bad news for Test Managers?”. Another posts are dealing with the topics “Test Early, to not fail often”, “Bugs are so yesterday”, “Measuring success in Testing”, “How do you surprise your team members during their next review?” and “The Tester Type Box – Why We Need To Break Out of It”.

Enjoy reading the posts and send me posts that are worth reading and I will mention you and link to your social links or blog.

Follow the work – bad news for Test Managers? – Rob Lambert Bad news for test managers

Read more

Mobile App Europe Summary and Slides

I am just back in Hamburg from the Mobile App Europe Conference and I am still excited about it. I had 2 great days in Potsdam meeting several mobile experts from all over the world to exchange on the latest mobile topics. I had the chance to talk to Dan Cuellar, the creator of Appium which was really great. I talked to people from booking.com, Groupon and other cool companies out there.

Another great thing was that I met Stephen Janaway and Richard Bradshaw again. We had some nice talks and at the end of the first day we were recording another episode of Testing in the Pub together with Denys Zelenchuck, Sergej Mudruk and André Gorzel.

Adventures in QA - Recording Testing in the Pub Read more

Mobile Testing with Bug Radar

Bug Radar - Adventures in QAMy colleague Denys Zelenchuk has developed a very helpful Android app called Bug Radar. The main task of this app is to monitor any app that is running on a test device. Whenever the app under test is crashing or not responding (ANR), Bug Radar notifies you about the problem in the notification center and is creating a error report file including the stacktrace and the device info. The report will be saved on the device in the Bug Radar folder and can be send via email for further investigation. Read more

People in Testing with Richard Bradshaw

Adventures in QA - Richard BradshawThis time in the “People in Testing” series, I had the chance to interview Richard Bradshaw aka the FriendlyTester.

Daniel: What is currently your biggest challenge at work?

Richard: Time! I am currently the sole tester on a project. Responsible for the testing of the apps, which include iOS, Android the a responsive website. Also until recently, this also included a windows phone app. It’s a lot to manage. So it becomes a real balancing act as to where I spend my time. Fortunately the team is aware of this and we stagger the releases. We tend to have iOS ready at least a week before Android. Then the web is more sporadic, mainly because we are able to release that instantly, so the risk is lower, due to the fact we can instantly rollback or push a fix if something was to go wrong, this isn’t as easy with the apps, especially iOS, due to the submission times. Another advantage of the way we work is that the platforms are aligned, meaning that we tend to be delivering the same functionality to all at the same time. This is advantageous to me as I can test across platforms at the same time, but also as with most projects, there is a lot of tacit knowledge, so testing all three while it’s still there helps. Read more