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[Reblog] Scaling Mobile at XING: Platform, Framework and Domain Teams

At XING, my current employer we had to handle some exciting challenges. We had to scale the whole mobile development as well as mobile testing from two small mobile teams (Android and iOS) to the whole software development department at XING.

My colleague Alexey Krivitsky wrote a great blog post about “Scaling Mobile at XING: Platform, Framework and Domain Teams” at InfoQ. In his post he describes our learnings from the last year, how we scaled, what we have learned and what structural changes had to be done in order to grow from 2 mobile teams to 10.

Enjoy reading this very interesting article. If you have similar problems in your organisation, let’s talk!

Scaling Mobile at XING: Platform, Framework and Domain Teams This article describes learning from XING on how to scale mobile development such that as many teams as necessary can contribute to the development of mobile apps (on both iOS and Android platforms) and at the same time keep the apps consistent, stable and shiny. It summarizes the key decisions and structural changes they made in order to enable scaling mobile from 2 to 10 teams.

#HappyTesting

Android Fragmentation Report - Adventures in QA

Android Fragmentation Report

As every year since 2012, the guys from OpenSignal release the Android fragmentation report. The latest report was just published and the results of it are amazing and at the same time really scary if you are an Android developer or Android tester. For the 2015 report, 682,000 devices were surveyed and 24,093 distinct Android devices are on the market. Last year in 2014 there were “only” 18,796 devices available. Within one year the Android device market grew by 5,297 more devices, which is amazing if you keep the new iOS devices in mind. Apple released in 2015 (well 2014) only 4 devices. The iPhone 6, iPhone 6+, the iPad Air 2 and the iPad mini 3. Read more

People in Testing Interview with Eddy Bruin

Eddy Bruin - Adventures in QAThis time in the “People in Testing” series, I had the chance to interview Eddy Bruin, who is an agile test coach in the Netherlands. Eddy is the co-founder of BUXIT, a community which goal it is to improve products through attention for User Experience.

Daniel: What is currently your biggest challenge at work?

Eddy: I’m currently an Agile coach in a big firm. It’s all pretty new to them and most of the developers are working on the other end of the world. My biggest challenge is coaching these people with the limited facilities we have. Only talking to a phone is hardly enough to create a team spirit and to communicate effectively. The biggest test challenge in this aspect is letting the team realize there are more ways to test besides exhaustive checking while treating the application as a complete black box. Let’s say that every time we change the color of the car the testers want to test the gearbox again. Read more

UI Testing by Apple - Adventures in QA

User Interface Testing by Apple

On this year’s WWDC 15 Apple presented a new way of user interface testing within Xcode 7. With the new version of Xcode Apple introduces user interface testing as a brand new feature of the existing XCText framework. The great thing about the new ui testing approach is that it is an extension to the existing APIs and concepts in XCTest. Developers who are familiar with XCode’s testing features will have no problems to adopt ui testing in their daily working life.

Apple introduced UI recording to Xcode where developers and testers are able to capture the current activities on the iOS simulator directly into the test method. Also interaction with the app will be recorded and added as test steps. The tool is using the accessibility labels in order to recognize the elements within the app. UI testing can be used with Swift and Objective-C, there is no need for JavaScript testing anymore. However, UI testing is only working with iOS9 devices.

Read more

Common Apple App Store Rejections

Since a couple of days (at least I never saw that page before) Apple provided a page with the most common app store rejections.

On the page several categroies are listed, providing information on how to prevent your app from being rejected.

When testing and/or submitting an iOS app have the following points in mind.

  • Crashes and Bugs: Submit the app if it is well tested.
  • Substandard User Interface: Be sure the app is following Apple’s design guides and design Dos and Dont’s.
  • Broken Links: All links must be functional.
  • Advertisements: If your app contains ads, be sure they are shown properly.
  • Placeholder Content: No lorem ipsum or any other kind of placeholder texts are allowed to be in the app.
  • Incomplete Information: Provide logins if your app requires them. Provide descriptions and images or videos of your app.
  • Web clippings, content aggregators, or a collections of links: In short, submit only native apps :).
  • Repeated Submission of Similar Apps: You are not allowed to submit several apps that are essentially the same.
  • Inaccurate Descriptions: App descriptions must be clear.
  • Misleading Users: Your app must work as advertised in the store.
  • Not enough lasting value: Your app should solve a problem to the user and must provide value.

Besides this little overview, Apple also provided the top 10 reasons why apps are currently rejected. Furthermore, the total percentage of app rejections is shwon. Find the numbers in the following pictures.

Top10 of app rejection reasons Total percentage of app rejections

 

Both pictures are screenshot from the Apple page and the figures are based on September 2014. I just wanted to give you a quick heads up to this page. The ULR to page is: https://developer.apple.com/app-store/review/rejections/

Happy testing.