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Mobile Testing with Bug Radar

Bug Radar - Adventures in QAMy colleague Denys Zelenchuk has developed a very helpful Android app called Bug Radar. The main task of this app is to monitor any app that is running on a test device. Whenever the app under test is crashing or not responding (ANR), Bug Radar notifies you about the problem in the notification center and is creating a error report file including the stacktrace and the device info. The report will be saved on the device in the Bug Radar folder and can be send via email for further investigation. Read more

How to record your Android tests with Robotium Recorder

A couple of weeks ago, I wrote a post about the release of Robotium Recorder.
Today I want to show you, how to install and how to use the tool to record your Android tests. This tutorial based on the example Notepad app provided by the Robotium project, the source code can be found here.

Prerequisites & Installation

Before you start with recording, you have to install the Java JDK and the Android SDK. Be sure you have the latest version of the Android SDK installed or updated. If your development environment is up to date, you can import the sample app, provided by the Robotium project. Please follow the instructions in the sample, on how to insert the existing project to eclipse.

If Java, the Android SDK and the sample project is downloaded and installed, start Eclipse and open the Install New Software section in the Help menu (Help → Install New Software). In the input field “Work with” enter: http://recorder.robotium.com/updates and Press the Add… button and enter a name for the installation.

1_install_robotium_via_help

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Espresso for Android

Last week the google Android team announced the launch of the developer preview for Espresso. Espresso is the new UI testing tool presented at the GTAC earlier this year. In the google testing blog it says:

The compelling thing about developing Espresso was making it easy and fun for developers to write reliable UI tests. Espresso has a small, predictable, and easy to learn API, which is still open for customization. But most importantly – Espresso removes the need to think about the complexity of multi-threaded testing. With Espresso, you can think procedurally and write concise, beautiful, and reliable Android UI tests quickly.

Google is using Espresso in more than 30 applications by now e.g. Google(Drive, Maps or G+). I just had a really quick look at the documentation and example of the tool and its looking quite nice. I will try it in the next couple of weeks and will post my impression here.


Find the Espresso sources here:

Espresso at GTAC 2013

Have fun!

How Google tests mobile apps

Today I found a really interesting blog post by the Google+ team and how they test the Google+ app for iOS and Android. In this post Google describes their mobile testing strategy. The team created 5 general rules, which they follow during the development and testing the Google+ app.

The rules are:

  1. Understand the platform. Testing on Android is not the same as testing on iOS. […] Read more

It’s like 10000 knives when all you need is a Spoon

Isn’t ironic that there are so many Android test automation tools and it took me half a year to stumble up on Spoon?
Spoon is an Android test automation tool that is able to run your written java tests on several devices at the same time WITHOUT rooting the device.
Spoon is developed by the company Square, the company already open sourced some really nice tools (see the Open Source Space).
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