Adventures in QA

Software Testing, Mobile Testing and Agile Development by Daniel Knott

Printed Copy of Hands-On Mobile App Testing

https://leanpub.com/mobiletestingToday, I want to share some really great news with you. I think you all know, that I have written a book about mobile testing called “Hands-On Mobile App Testing” which is available since October 2014 on leanpub.
Since the book is available, I got really great feedback from people from around the world who were reading it. I never expected so many great feedback and responses. However, I also got lots of e-mails asking for a printed copy of my book. In the first place my idea was to publish the book via leanpub to have full control of the publishing process and the lightweight service they offer to distribute eBooks online. However, self publishing a printed copy of the book is not possible for me as a single person.

Therefore, I want to announce the printed copy of my book “Hands-On Mobile App Testing”. The famous book publisher Pearson formerly known as Addison Wesley will publish my book in a printed copy and eBook version.

This is a really great honor for me, because Pearson already published famous software testing books from software testing experts like:

Currently, I am reworking some chapters together with Pearson in my spare time to deliver the final manuscript in the next upcoming weeks. The final printed copy will then be available later this year in all known online and offline bookshops around the world.

Publishing the book with Pearson means that I will have to remove the leanpub version before the book will be available via Pearson. Don’t worry, this will take a couple of months and you can still buy it. If you like a printed copy of it, you have to wait some more months :).

I hope you like the update about my book and because of the great news, I will reduce the price of the book permanently to $9,99 ($ 11.89 including VAT).

If there are any new updates about this project, I will let you know!

Happy Testing!

Reading Recommendations # 7

Reading Recommendations Daniel KnottHere is the 7th episode of my reading recommendations. This issue contains 7 great posts from topics like why software testers don’t break the software, how a tester can represent a user, how to manage the risks when adding software testers to a project, some information for people who are new to the software testing business. A post about the question Am I a tester?
The last two posts are my favorites for this issue. The first one is from Stephen Janaway who wrote about a software tester portfolio and what to do to create a great software testing portfolio on the web as well as in the software testing industry. The second one is from Richard Bradshaw and is about blink testing in a mobile context.

Enjoy reading the posts.

  1. Testers Don’t Break the Software
    Author: Michael Bolton
  2. As a tester, I can represent a user
    Author: Maaret Pyhäjärvi
  3. When adding testers, manage the risks
    Author: Maaret Pyhäjärvi
  4. Letter to a starting tester
    Author: Joel Montvelisky
  5. Am I a Tester?
    Author: Peter Karas
  6. A TESTERS PORTFOLIO
    Author: Stephen Janaway
  7. Blink Testing In A Mobile Context
    Author: Richard Bradshaw

If you have some interesting posts to share them here at the reading recommendations, don’t hesitate to contact me or to comment on this post.

Happy Testing!

Reading Recommendations # 6

Reading Recommendations Daniel KnottHere is the 6th episode of my reading recommendations. This issue contains six posts from different topics like how it’s tested: “Cuckoo clocks”, “The 8 Fs of Software Failure”, “Automation is key but don’t automate manual tests”, “Test your knowledge with uTest University Quizzes”, “How to embed screenshot in Cucumber reports” and “Testing beyond requirements? How much is enough?”
The last post from Alister Scott is my highly recommended read in this edition.

Enjoy reading the posts.

  1. How it’s Tested: Cuckoo Clocks
    Author: Mario Gonzalez Macedo
  2. The Eight Fs of Software Failure
    Author: Gerald M. Weinberg
  3. Automation is key, but don’t automate manual tests!
    Author: Matt Griscom
  4. Test Your Knowledge With uTest University Quizzes
    Author: Linda Frembes
  5. How to embed screenshot in Cucumber report across various environments
    Author: Karlo Smid
  6. Testing beyond requirements? How much is enough?
    Author: Alister Scott

If you have some interesting posts to share them here at the reading recommendations, don’t hesitate to contact me or to comment on this post.

Happy Testing!

Top 114 Software Testing Blogs 2014

Award - Adventures in QALast week I found out that my blog was ranked 29th of the best software testing blogs of 2014. In total 114 blogs are listed on the page from TestBuffet. I was not aware that my blog was listed there, but it seems that TestBuffet is checking the software testing community and collects valuable sources for other software testers to improve their craft.
For me it is a great honor, to be in this list with my blog and I never expected to be ranked that good :). Thanks to all of you who are visiting and reading my posts.

Here are the top 5 blogs:

  1. Software testing help
    Vijay Shinde
  2. James Bach’s blog
    James Bach
  3. Google Testing Blog
    various
  4. Observations on software testing and quality
    Michael Bolton
  5. Association for Software Testing
    Various

If you want to get further information about TestBuffet check the About section. In this section you will also find some more information about the ranking system.

TestBuffet defines it goals as follows:

Our goal is to bring structure in this web of information. We gather software testing related blogs from around the world, assign them a category and rank those blogs by their popularity. This can be the place for testers to start reading.

The complete list of blogs can be found here.

Happy Testing!

Cheat Sheet for Submitting Mobile Apps

Apps - Adventures in QAThanks to my great software testing network, I stumbled up on an very interesting mobile article about mobile app submissions. The article has been written by Simon Moser in german.

Simon collected all important and required information that are necessary to submit a mobile app to the stores from Apple, Google and Windows. If you are not able to read german, here are the important information from the article that can be used as a mobile submission cheat sheet for your app.

Text and Contact information

Apple App StoreGoogle Play StoreWindows Phone Store
App Name255 characters30 characters255 characters
Description4000 characters4000 characters5000 characters
Keywords100 characters(not available)up to 5
Categoryprimary (required)
secondary (optional)
App Type and categoryprimary (required)
secondary (optional)
Support-URLx(not available)(not available)
Marketing-URLxxx
Privacy-Policy-URLxxx
Support eMail-Addressx(not available)x
Copyright or company namexxx
Update Description4000 characters500 characters2000 characters

Graphics and Videos

Apple App StoreGoogle Play StoreWindows Phone Store
App Icon1024×1024 png or jpg
no transparency
no rounded corners
512×512 png
optional also with transparency
300×300 png
no transparency
Graphics(not available)1024×500 png or jpg
no transparency
1000×800 png or jpg
no transparency
Marketing Graphics (optional)(not available)180×120 png or jpg
no transparency
1000×800, 358×358,
358×173 png or jpg
no transparency
TV-Banner (optional)(not available)320×180 png or jpg
no transparency
(not available)
Videos (optional)Video must have the format M4V, MP4 or MOW and are not allowed to be bigger than500 MBURL of a single YouTube video(not available)

Screenshots

Apple App Store

Resolution
4,7 inch1 Screenshot per language. 4 optional screenshots.(Required when iPhone 6 is supported, otherwise optional.)
5,5 inch1 Screenshot per language. 4 optional screenshots.(Required when iPhone 6+ is supported, otherwise optional.)
4 inch1 Screenshot per language. 4 optional screenshots.
3,5 inch1 Screenshot per language. 4 optional screenshots.
iPad1 Screenshot per language. 4 optional screenshots.(Required when iPad is supported, otherwise optional.)

Google Play Store

Device Class
PhoneMax. 8 per language.
7 inch TabletMax. 8 per language.
10 inch TabletMax. 8 per language.
TVMax. 8 per language.

Windows Phone Store

ResolutionOS Version
WVGA1 screenshot required, 7 optional. Since Windows Phone OS 7.1 and 8.0.
WXVGA1 screenshot required, 7 optional. Since Windows Phone OS 7.1 and 8.0.
HD720p1 screenshot required, 7 optional. Since Windows Phone OS 7.1 and 8.0.

 

Further Links

If you need further information about each platform check the following links:

 

Thanks again to Simon, for writing up this post!

Happy Testing!

Reading Recommendations # 5

Reading Recommendations Daniel KnottHere is the 5th episode of my reading recommendations. This issue contains five posts from topics like how to interview software testers, quest for testers, a very nice video podcast from OpenSignal about Mobile Sensor Networks. Furthermore, I added a nice post from Stephen Janaway where he wrote about his experiences with a testing bug bash. Last but not least there is another interesting post from Martin about mobile user expectations and retailer apps. Don’t miss to read it!

Enjoy reading the posts.

  1. Interview Testers As If You Want Testers
    Author: Jeff Nyman
  2. The Quest for Testers
    Author: Jeff Nyman
  3. OpenSignal Podcast No.1: Mobile Sensor Networks
    Authors: Samuel Johnston and James Robinson
  4. EXPERIENCES OF A TESTING BUG BASH
    Author: Stephen Janaway
  5. 77% will not download a Retail app rated lower than 3 stars
    Author: Martin Poschenrieder

If you have some interesting posts to share them here at the reading recommendations, don’t hesitate to contact me or to comment on this post.

Happy Testing!

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